Did you know? 

  • Tate & Lyle is one of the largest processors of corn in the United States, processing around 2% of the annual corn crop.
  • We produce a vast range of food and industrial ingredients and can count many of the world's top 100 food and beverage companies as our customers. We produce hundreds of ingredients that go into thousands of products enjoyed by millions of people around the world.
  • We have no higher priority than safety.
  • Our Decatur, Illinois plant receives corn by truck and rail cars. All of the corn used in the plant is unloaded and stored in the plant’s highly-automated elevators, which can hold over four million bushels of corn.
  • The Tate & Lyle corn business in the US used to be called A.E. Staley Manufacturing Company, and was founded in 1906 by Augustus Eugene (Gene) Staley.
  • Augustus Staley founded a football league in 1920. The members of his team, the Decatur Staleys, worked as semi-professionals in his factory. Later the team moved to Chicago and was renamed the Chicago Bears. The team's mascot to this day is "Staley Da Bear".
  • Sucralose was discovered in 1976 by scientists at Queen Elizabeth College, University of London, working with scientists from Tate & Lyle.
  • DuPont Tate & Lyle Bio Products, our joint-venture with DuPont to produce Bio-PDO™ in Loudon, was established in 2004.
  • Over the years, many pieces of furniture from the Decatur Administration Building that are no longer needed have been purchased by Decatur’s Associated Office Furnishings. Movie set directors often turn to Associated Office Furnishings to rent or purchase 20th century furnishings. Some of our former furniture was shipped from Decatur to London for filming movies in the Batman and Harry Potter series.
  • Tate & Lyle has a network of 14 country elevators which supply the Decatur and Lafayette plants with around 25% of our corn each year and are the backbone of our grain procurement activities in the US. Some have rail connections, while others rely on our own trucks to collect and deliver grain.
Corn

History