Environment 

Today it’s a given that we must understand and reduce our impact on the natural environment. Most nations have signed up to targets for carbon emissions, and legislation for the corporate world is increasingly stringent as far as environmental issues are concerned.

Man in water treatment plant

We are committed to conducting our business in a manner that is sensitive to the environment as well as to the needs of the communities in which we operate. 

At Tate & Lyle, we believe that achieving sustainable growth in harmony with the environment is not only socially responsible, it’s what our customers want and it makes good business sense. We are therefore committed to conducting our business in a manner that is sensitive to the environment as well as to the needs of the communities in which we operate.

What does this mean in practice?
We have defined environmental standards and practices in all our operations, and we actively encourage our business partners to demonstrate similar levels of commitment.

  • All our operations fully integrate sustainable management practices into their operational systems and procedures.
  • Our Board reviews environmental performance annually to ensure that we continue to make progress in reducing our impact on the environment while bringing economic benefits to Tate & Lyle.

You can download our Group Environmental Mission Statement and Policy here:

Man in Hard hat

Manufacturing excellence

DuPont Tate & Lyle – an energy-saving partnership

DuPont Tate & Lyle – an energy-saving partnership

Corn is a completely ‘renewable’ resource. Turning it into products previously made from petro-chemicals can be good for the environment – and for business.

Our 50:50 joint venture with DuPont in Loudon, US, uses corn sugar to make the multi-purpose monomer propanediol, or PDO – which favourably competes with rivals relying on a petro-chemical process.

“Our Bio-PDO™ is 100 per cent renewable – it has a unique place in the market, because nobody else is making it on a commercial scale with a biological process,” says Pete Castelli, who is Vice President, Law and Compliance, and one of two Tate & Lyle directors on the joint venture’s board. “We have done a ‘life-cycle’ analysis – and our method uses 40 per cent less energy than petro-chemical production.”

The joint venture sells the Bio-PDO™ directly as Zemea™ – used in cosmetics and detergents; and Susterra™ – an agent in de-icers. DuPont also uses it to make the carpet and clothing textile, Sorona®.